rsync(1) -axvH --no-g --no-p  $HOME/projects/<project>/some_other_directory $HOME/projects/<project2>/some_directory
a fast, versatile, remote (and local) file-copying tool
-a, --archive
       This is equivalent to -rlptgoD. It is a quick way  of  saying  you  want  recursion  and  want  to
       preserve  almost  everything  (with -H being a notable omission).  The only exception to the above
       equivalence is when --files-from is specified, in which case -r is not implied.

       Note that -a does not preserve hardlinks, because finding multiply-linked files is expensive.  You
       must separately specify -H.
-x, --one-file-system
       This  tells rsync to avoid crossing a filesystem boundary when recursing.  This does not limit the
       user’s ability to specify items to copy from multiple filesystems, just rsync’s recursion  through
       the  hierarchy  of each directory that the user specified, and also the analogous recursion on the
       receiving side during deletion.  Also keep in mind that rsync treats a "bind" mount  to  the  same
       device as being on the same filesystem.

       If  this option is repeated, rsync omits all mount-point directories from the copy.  Otherwise, it
       includes an empty directory at each mount-point it encounters (using the attributes of the mounted
       directory because those of the underlying mount-point directory are inaccessible).

              If  rsync  has been told to collapse symlinks (via --copy-links or --copy-unsafe-links), a symlink
              to a directory on another device is treated like a mount-point.  Symlinks to  non-directories  are
              unaffected by this option.
-v, --verbose
       This  option  increases  the amount of information you are given during the transfer.  By default,
       rsync works silently. A single -v will give you information about what files are being transferred
       and  a  brief summary at the end. Two -v options will give you information on what files are being
       skipped and slightly more information at the end. More than two -v options should only be used  if
       you are debugging rsync.

       Note that the names of the transferred files that are output are done using a default --out-format
       of "%n%L", which tells you just the name of the file and, if the item is a link, where it  points.
       At  the  single  -v  level  of  verbosity,  this  does not mention when a file gets its attributes
       changed.  If you ask for an itemized list  of  changed  attributes  (either  --itemize-changes  or
       adding  "%i"  to  the  --out-format  setting), the output (on the client) increases to mention all
       items that are changed in any way.  See the --out-format option for more details.
-H, --hard-links
       This  tells  rsync to look for hard-linked files in the source and link together the corresponding
       files on the destination.  Without this option, hard-linked files in the  source  are  treated  as
       though they were separate files.

       This  option does NOT necessarily ensure that the pattern of hard links on the destination exactly
       matches that on the source.  Cases in which the destination may  end  up  with  extra  hard  links
       include the following:

       o      If the destination contains extraneous hard-links (more linking than what is present in the
              source file list), the copying algorithm will not break them explicitly.  However,  if  one
              or  more  of  the paths have content differences, the normal file-update process will break
              those extra links (unless you are using the --inplace option).

       o      If you specify a --link-dest directory  that  contains  hard  links,  the  linking  of  the
              destination  files against the --link-dest files can cause some paths in the destination to
              become linked together due to the --link-dest associations.

       Note that rsync can only detect hard links between files that are inside  the  transfer  set.   If
       rsync  updates  a  file  that  has extra hard-link connections to files outside the transfer, that
       linkage will be broken.  If you are tempted to use the --inplace option to avoid this breakage, be
       very  careful  that  you  know  how  your  files are being updated so that you are certain that no
       unintended changes happen due to lingering hard links (and  see  the  --inplace  option  for  more
       caveats).

              If  incremental  recursion  is  active (see --recursive), rsync may transfer a missing hard-linked
              file before it finds that another link for that contents exists elsewhere in the hierarchy.   This
              does not affect the accuracy of the transfer (i.e. which files are hard-linked together), just its
              efficiency (i.e. copying the data for a new, early copy of a hard-linked file that could have been
              found  later in the transfer in another member of the hard-linked set of files).  One way to avoid
              this inefficiency is to disable incremental recursion using the --no-inc-recursive option.
Local:  rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [DEST]

Access via remote shell:
  Pull: rsync [OPTION...] [USER@]HOST:SRC... [DEST]
  Push: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [USER@]HOST:DEST

Access via rsync daemon:
  Pull: rsync [OPTION...] [USER@]HOST::SRC... [DEST]
        rsync [OPTION...] rsync://[USER@]HOST[:PORT]/SRC... [DEST]
  Push: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [USER@]HOST::DEST
        rsync [OPTION...] SRC... rsync://[USER@]HOST[:PORT]/DEST
Before a command is executed, its input and output may be redirected using a special notation interpreted
by  the  shell.   Redirection  may  also  be used to open and close files for the current shell execution
environment.  The following redirection operators may precede or appear anywhere within a simple  command
or may follow a command.  Redirections are processed in the order they appear, from left to right.

Redirecting Input
    Redirection  of  input  causes  the  file  whose name results from the expansion of word to be opened for
    reading on file descriptor n, or the standard input (file descriptor 0) if n is not specified.

    The general format for redirecting input is:

           [n]<word
Before a command is executed, its input and output may be redirected using a special notation interpreted
by  the  shell.   Redirection  may  also  be used to open and close files for the current shell execution
environment.  The following redirection operators may precede or appear anywhere within a simple  command
or may follow a command.  Redirections are processed in the order they appear, from left to right.

Redirecting Output
    Redirection of output causes the file whose name results from the expansion of  word  to  be  opened  for
    writing  on  file descriptor n, or the standard output (file descriptor 1) if n is not specified.  If the
    file does not exist it is created; if it does exist it is truncated to zero size.

    The general format for redirecting output is:

           [n]>word

    If the redirection operator is >, and the noclobber option to the  set  builtin  has  been  enabled,  the
    redirection  will  fail if the file whose name results from the expansion of word exists and is a regular
    file.  If the redirection operator is >|, or the redirection operator is > and the  noclobber  option  to
    the  set  builtin  command  is  not  enabled, the redirection is attempted even if the file named by word
    exists.
source manpages: rsync